Tantamount Podcast Episode Three Supplemental Material

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This material augments the information provided in the podcast Tantamount about Washington DC’s serial killer, The Freeway Phantom. Obviously we encourage you to listen to the episode. Here’s a link to this episode:  Tantamount Catch me if you can! 

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The Freeway Phantom finishes his murder spree with the deaths of Brenda Woodard, Diane Williams, and, we learn, Teara Ann Bryant.  The FBI and some officers who worked the case believe Teara was part of the Freeway Phantom’s list of victims, while the Washington MPD and Prince George’s County Police do not.  If not, the question remains, who killed Teara Ann Bryant?

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Where Brenda’s Body was found
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Brenda’s wig, tossed there by the killer

Perhaps the most bizarre aspect of the final killings was the note left on the body of Brenda Woodard.  Written in her own hand, at the order of his killer, the Freeway Phantom used the note to taunt authorities.

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The note left by the killer on Brenda’s body
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Diane Williams
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Brenda Woodard 
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Teara Ann Bryant – Our research shows that she too was a victim of the Freeway Phantom

The murders stop with the death of Ms. Bryant…leaving us all to wonder why?  Was the killer jailed, dead, or had he moved on?

If you want to know more, subscribe to our podcast or read our book:  Tantamount – The Pursuit of the Freeway Phantom Serial Killer.

Review of the True Crime Podcast – Going West

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My wife and I went to Michigan this weekend to help my mother-in-law move.  She likes podcasts so we listened to several, one in particular, Going West.  This review is based on listening to nine episodes, binge-style, on the Ohio and Pennsylvania Turnpikes.  They did not ask for this review – it is unsolicited.  Nor do I have any relationship with the podcasters.

My daughter and I started our podcast, Tantamount, and agreed up-front on format, style, and tone.  I’m not a fan of those true crime podcasts where drinking or humor is a big component.  It seems disrespectful to the victims and as an author in the genre, I try and avoid those podcasts.  There are a ton of true crime podcasts out there, and Going West proved to be one of the more entertaining and produced.

The format simple – two narrators taking you on a journey through one crime.  Some are solved, some are not.  The narrators have very professional voices and the production quality is top-notch. What my wife and I liked was that there was not a lot of their theories or wild speculations in the episodes.  They present the facts.  When they do tell you what they are thinking, they call that out so you don’t confuse their comments with the facts in the case.  A lot of podcasters could learn from this technique…I know I did.

There is occasional (rare) swearing, but it is well-placed (and often exactly what I was thinking!)

The mix of cases is well-thought-out.  Their research seems fairly solid too, which is critical. Where there are conflicting accounts of events, they let you know.  That is important, trust me.

Going West has a pleasing conversational tone and is paced well.  Some podcasts are like drinking through a firehose, while others go off on so many tangents that you struggle with following the story.  Going West weaves a story without being formulaic.  Sometimes they start with the crime, sometimes they start with the victim…it makes binging their episodes easy to do.

My wife, who only marginally likes podcasts, said that this is now one of her favorites.  That alone is high praise.

There are a ton of podcasts out there and Going West is one of the best I’ve stumbled across.  Easily a five out of five stars.

Podcast Tantamount Episode Two Supplemental Material – Body Count

 

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In our podcast on the Washington DC serial killer, the Freeway Phantom, we dive into the victims.  I wanted to provide listeners with some additional material to augment the podcast.

One of the more disturbing mishandlings of cases is that of Darlenia Johnson.  Her remains spotted by a motorist along I-295, just 15 feet from where Carol Spinks had been found, but the police didn’t recover her for over a week.  Officers were dispatched, but they drove by, not seeing her, rather than get out of their car.  She remained unattended in the hot July sun for days.

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Darlenia Johnson

Brenda Faye Crockett stands out because the Phantom allowed her to call home while she was his prisoner…twice.  Both times she claimed that a white man had driven her to Virginia and would send her home in a taxi.  On the second call, she asked if her mother saw her.  This is important.  Was the Phantom worried that he had been seen with her in his vehicle?  Did personally know Mrs. Crockett and was afraid that she was sending police after him?

Clearly the references to a “white man” and “Virginia” were deception.  No serial killer would allow his victim to give out actual useful clues to the family and authorities.  If anything, this should have helped investigators narrow their search to not include white suspects or residents in Virginia.  But at the time, the concept of a serial killer was unknown.  You had repeat offenders, but the phrase “serial killer” was years away from these crimes.

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Brenda Crockett.  Her two phone calls home were clearly out of fear on the part of the Phantom.

Nenomoshia Yates was only 12 years old when she was abducted, raped, and strangled by the killer.  She was found the day after her abduction on Route 50 in Prince George’s County Maryland.  She was just 3/10’s of a mile over the border from the District of Columbia.  So had the killer put here there to muddy the investigation by bringing in another agency?  Why not leave her along I-295 as he had his other victims?  What was so different with her or the road that night that compelled him to leave her elsewhere?

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Young Miss Yates.  
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The road where Nenomoshia Yates was found

For those of you that want to know more, you can buy our book Tantamount or you can follow our podcast on Podbean, Spotify, and iTunes.   Episode 2 – Body Count

Kicking off our True Crime Podcast – Tantamount: Season One, Episode One

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So this is the start of our first season of Tantamount – a true crime podcast about our most recent book on the Washington DC Freeway Phantom serial killer.

Here’s some of the links to get to it:

Podbean

Spotify

Coming soon to iTune Podcasts

Victoria, my daughter and co-author, and I have been wanting to get into podcasting for a while.  It seemed a perfect fit with the new book coming out.  I didn’t want to do a short one-shot podcast, but one that allowed us to go beyond the book and really dive into this serial killing spree.

When we write a book, we focus on the facts.  Our goal is to present information, not shove our opinions on the reader.  The podcast lets us talk about what we think and feel, things that wouldn’t play well in a book.

There were some parameters for this effort we felt were important:

  • The podcast had to stand on its own.  You didn’t have to buy or read the book to follow it.
  • We wanted it to be the first of a series.  So season one is on the Freeway Phantom.  We have plans for future seasons that will dive into other cases…some we’ve written about, some that we just are intrigued with.
  • It had to be as professional as we could produce on our own.
  • We wouldn’t launch it unless we had at least two episodes in the queue.  Episode #2 will pop sometime in the next few days.
  • We wanted some links to this blog where we could post some things we didn’t put in the book directly – some source material for those that wanted to explore more about the episode.
  • This first episode is about why we undertook this book, investing two years of our lives into the case. I would love to tell you there is some magical formula we use to determine if we are digging into a crime, but in reality, a lot of it is gut-check-level stuff.

We also start with the first victim – Carol Spinks.  I’ve included copies of her police report here.  It gives you an idea of what our starting point was for this – which wasn’t much.

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Carol Spinks – The First Victim

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I am not an audio editor or expert in podcasting. I spent more time editing than anything else. It is a great learning curve for both Victoria and me.  Please be gentle with your comments.

For my BattleTech fans, yes, I want to do something in that space and have started scripting out my first episode – on Snord’s Irregulars.  So far the working titles include:  Old Fart’s BattleTech, Ammo Dump, and All Systems Not Nominal.

So, please subscribe and share our podcast and if you want more information, get out book!

Review of the True Crime Podcast – Man in the Window

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I am not a huge podcast follower when it comes to true crime.  When I do listen, I put one on in the background when I write.  There is a lot of people competing in the true crime space for podcast time.  Some don’t resonate with me well.  I don’t like the ones that joke a great deal.  I get it, you want to stand out and lighten the mood.  To me, it feels disrespectful.  Same for the drinking and true crime podcasts.  I never got into the concept you could pair a wine with a crime…but that is a matter of personal preference on my part.

We drove to Michigan this week to visit family and my wife asked me to play some true crime podcasts on the trip.  This was high on my list and I was not let down.

Man in the Window is gripping.  One, it was done by a writer for the LA Times who has dived deep into the Golden State Killer case.  This podcast really grabs you with a mix of interview snippets and a compelling story.  It is professionally produced, top-notch stuff.  At the same time, the most gripping part is not the production – it is that it provides us all with an in-depth view of the Joseph DeAngelo, the accused Golden State Killer.

Accused is a light word here, a formality.  It is hard to dodge multiple DNA hits.  He totally did it.  But what we have never gotten is “why.”  This podcast gets us much closer to that answer, delving into his background.  The interview with his former girlfriend is creepy, and weird, and the kind of stuff you can’t pause.

This is good investigative journalism colliding with social media to produce a wonderful and sufficiently eerie experience.   I highly recommend this podcast to any true crime aficionado.  An easy five out of five stars.